Sansevieria early activity

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Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#1  Postby Spination » Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:45 am

Winter is a bad time for my Sansevieria collection. I keep them in a heated enclose to avoid the dreaded cold (much below 50F is not so good for them), and water very sparingly as well. That the cold (freezing days) were so numerous and lasting all the way into March didn't help much either.
However, with warmer days here again, more regular watering resumed as well, I see some early activity.

Most obvious, the bloom on this fan shaped hybrid called S. 'Boncel'. With it's "ribs" showing, regular watering should fatten up those leaves again in time.
2017 03 21 Sansevieria Boncel a X800.jpg
2017 03 21 Sansevieria Boncel a X800.jpg (203.67 KiB) Viewed 695 times


A bit hidden, my first arborescens offset coming up at the edge of the pot. Not sure why, but this specimen has exploded in growth since I've had it, while 2 others still looking alive and well, but relatively unchanged size-wise since acquisition.
2017 03 21 Sansevieria arborescens and offset X800.jpg
2017 03 21 Sansevieria arborescens and offset X800.jpg (227.91 KiB) Viewed 695 times


Although in the works for a bit, the offset for this S. pearsonii also now shows to be variegated (not a given apparently with the variegates).
2017 03 21 Sansevieria pearsonii and offset X800.jpg
2017 03 21 Sansevieria pearsonii and offset X800.jpg (216.2 KiB) Viewed 695 times


S. Stuckyi (one of my faves) and the 2 offsets still growing, but not showing any sign of variegation. Thank goodness I did not leave this in the unheated greenhouse kit like 2 S. masoniana which are now both in Sansevieria Heaven. Otherwise, I'm pretty sure this would be gone as well.
2017 03 21 Sansevieria stuckyii X800.jpg
2017 03 21 Sansevieria stuckyii X800.jpg (285.02 KiB) Viewed 695 times


Last, and hard to see exactly what is supposed to be then center of attention in this photo, is S. canaliculata, which is the arching leave which starts in the lower right, and curves across the top to the left. It now has an offset, with it's relatively short leaf still pretty straight. I suspect that the curving feature of the leaves may be something that develops with maturity. Looks like this offset is variegated too. Winner-winner-chicken-dinner!
2017 03 21 Sansevieria canaliculata and offset X800.jpg
2017 03 21 Sansevieria canaliculata and offset X800.jpg (204.87 KiB) Viewed 695 times
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#2  Postby Agave_fan » Mon Mar 27, 2017 1:11 pm

I really like this thread because now, I can stop referring to mine as 'the big snakelike pointy things" and start calling them Sansevieria. ;)
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#3  Postby Spination » Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:04 pm

Snake plant is one of the several common names, but the funniest one has got to be "Mother-In-Law's Tongue". :))
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#4  Postby Agave_fan » Mon Mar 27, 2017 3:24 pm

I have heard the mother in-laws tongue for the flat leaf variety but I didn't know it applied to other varieties as well.

I am new and not the most computer savvy person so please let me know if it is improper forum etiquette to post photos in your thread or if my photos are not appropriate in size and I will edit and remove or change.

I got my Sansevieria (unsure of species) 4-5 years ago. I had no clue what it was and unfortunately, the garden center didn't either but that didn't stop me from buying it. I was told it did not like the bright sun and I am embarrassed to admit, I did no further research so mine has only had limited morning sun.

Sadly, many of the spears/spikes took some heavy hail damage a few years ago and those blemishes just stay forever. I have been tempted to remove all the blemished spikes but I keep telling myself that beauty is more than skin deep with this plant. ;)
sans.jpg
Sansevieria- please ignore what used to be my yard before the feral hogs got to it. Excavation work starts tomorrow.Largest spear is 5'
sans.jpg (90.01 KiB) Viewed 664 times


Although new stalks/spikes/spears have emerged over the years, I don't think the conditions (soil or sun exposure) has been optimal for this plant. The mixture I am using is a pre-packaged cactus mix but I have had some moisture issues at the base of a few so it may not be as well draining as it needs or when I water (infrequently), I saturate too much? I am leaning toward the soil composition. I have also had some issues with the tips of some of these as you can see in the new growth photo below.

The root system of this plant seems fragile or my soil is just too... loose/soft? Ok, probably not a good attempt at describing what I mean. The spikes seem fairly unstable and wobbly and do not travel well when I move the container indoors during the winter. Each year I lose a spike or two (just falls over) that I end up just tossing in another container where it re-roots.

The plant was very mottled and quite striking when I first got it and it has turned much darker green over the years which I am guessing has a lot to do with lighting and/or soil conditions? The largest of the spikes is 5' and the larger spikes have smoothed out and lost much of the original ridging. I wasn't sure if this was natural or due to lighting/soil conditions but I noticed in your post you mentioned that this (ridge/ribbing) might fill out based on hydration? Almost all my new stalks/spikes are mottled when they first emerge but I noticed that one emerging today on the sunnier side actually came up a very pretty blue color.
sans new growth.jpg
new growth starts mottled
sans new growth.jpg (46.36 KiB) Viewed 664 times


I decided today to take the two stalks/spikes/spears (someone please help me with the correct terminology lol) that fell over during transport this year and plant them where they would have a bit more sun in a better draining sandier (firmer) soil. It will be interesting to see the difference this might make in appearance.
sans root.jpg
One of the fallen- older dried roots and new growth
sans root.jpg (47.83 KiB) Viewed 664 times
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#5  Postby Spination » Mon Mar 27, 2017 6:01 pm

Looks good. :U Thanks for sharing your photos. In the 4-5 years you've had them, have they flowered for you?
Good job rooting the wayward leaves.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#6  Postby Gee.S » Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:31 pm

I agree with your assessment that the soil is too coarse and suggest you ditch the cactus mix in favor of standard potting soil. You could have S. cylindrica there.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#7  Postby Agave_fan » Tue Mar 28, 2017 5:03 am

I have never seen flowers but perhaps this has something to do with the conditions. :(

Looking at photos, mine do look very much like the S. cylindrica in shape/color/pattern. I have never seen any form in the fan shape that the description of this species sometimes refers to though. My new growth just seems to shoot up anywhere without a pattern and sometimes an inch or so away from the other spikes. As they grow, they look closer but nothing like the fan shape I have seen mentioned with S. cylindrica. Are there some S. cylindrica varieties that do not form the fan shape?

Thanks for the advice on soil, I will make some changes.

I will also change my previous post to reflect that I am unsure on species.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#8  Postby Spination » Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:26 am

I had consulted The Splendid Sansevieria (Chahinian) book yesterday wondering if there was anything besides S. stuckyi that fit your plants, as there are several species that have that spear like shape. That's why I was curious if you've ever seen it flower. S. fischeri came to mind as more similar than not in growth, except that it has both a juvenile and mature form. The juvenile form is a rosette, and some years later evolves into spears, so that doesn't fit with your experience of the plant. Something like cylindrica and similar species are too short, and not single leaves either, whether the form is fan or rosette. Consulting the "key to species" at the end of Chahinian's book did not really point me to anything else. S. canaliculata is also very similar, but way too small and delicate in comparison as well. I think S. stuckyi best fits what you've got there, and the 5' tall round leaves pretty much zero that one down as the most likely fit.

I agree with Gee that the more loose cactus mix may not be allowing the roots to support the plant sufficiently, since some leaves seem to want to fall over when you transport the pot, so perhaps something more cohesive would stop leaves from falling over. However, Sans do not like wet feet, so it still has to be well draining mix, and cactus mix does that job well. An idea would be to add another layer of pea gravel as top dressing, or something larger like small rocks to give the leaves at their base more support. The only other thing I see, is that the pot has limited lateral space, and it might be a bit crowded with all those leaves. S. stuckyi in the ground would like to spread out a lot more. Perhaps though you have a good way of propagating them as is, with the only ingredient missing the removal of some of those crowded leaves, and splitting up that forest into additional pots. ::wink::

Anyway, you've had them for a number of years, they look healthy and happy, so what you're doing is obviously good. In my experience, I've found that tinkering with conditions when plants are already doing just fine is sometimes asking for trouble.... that old saying - "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". D))
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#9  Postby Agave_fan » Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:35 pm

The container they are in is definitely a weird shape- 20" height 26" tip to tip, but only 15" across in center and does taper toward each end. I love the container and have a smaller matching one close by with some squid agave in it so I think I might just take a few of the more blemished ones out to make some room as I have several new spikes coming in.

I do have some stones on top of the mix now, I was thinking that perhaps these might even be the reason the tips are being scarred when having to push through? I started off with some finer crushed granite stone on top making a more compact surface and when some of the spikes fell over during transport, I changed over to some larger more jagged stones. This past winter I changed to smoother edge stone just in case the stones were the issue with the tip damage I had been seeing over the years. Probably not the issue but aesthetically, I do like the smoother flat black stones anyway.
sans base.jpg
Base
sans base.jpg (65.88 KiB) Viewed 633 times


Today I went to the place that I got the plant from years ago just to see if they had anything like it. They had something marked Sansevieria 'Mikado' but it didn't look exactly like what I have. The mottling was similar and they looked like full spears but up close you could see that about 1/4 of each one was concave. I am sorry, I do not know the correct terms (I will learn though). I also noticed extra leafage at the base of some of the spikes that was purple in color and I have not seen this on any of mine. Otherwise, very similar to what I have. When I looked up 'mikado', cylindrica came up.

Although I passed on the Sansevieria, I did come home with some misc cactus/succulents, everything from Agave Parryi v Neomexicana (A. Neomexicana) to a huge container of very tall Hesperaloe funifera ssp chiangii that has been sitting in the same spot and container for 3 years. I had looked at this several times over the years and decided today to finally give it a home in my new landscaping. This broader leaf ssp is supposedly ok down to 10F so going to take my chance with it.

Thanks for all your help, sorry I hijacked your thread.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#10  Postby Azuleja » Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:59 pm

Mikado is not a species but rather a style of planting and arrangement of the spikes. It took me a while to figure this out. Apparently there are several named planting styles.

Congrats on the other finds!
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#11  Postby Spination » Tue Mar 28, 2017 1:12 pm

Hijack? Nah, I don't see it that way. We're all travelers here looking to help each other out. It's all good.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#12  Postby Gee.S » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:05 pm

S. cylindrica too short? It's every bit as tall as S. stuckyi -- about 2m.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#13  Postby Spination » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:38 pm

Below is my S. cylindrica, albeit a relatively young plant (few years only and the original plant featuring the juvenile rosette form) Eventually though, the underground creeping rhizome should eventually produce less rosette-like structures of taller leaves : "leaves 2-3 that are quite erect, stiff, distichous to 1.5m (5 ft.) long..."
I would expect those heights would take years to achieve, and still you're not going to see individual and separate leaves coming out of the soil as with S. stuckyi. Even mature, I would expect to see 2-3 leaves to a growth for S. cylindrica, whereas S. stuckyi can be a single leaf growth.

2016 08 30 Sansevieria cylindrica Variegated X800.jpg
2016 08 30 Sansevieria cylindrica Variegated X800.jpg (171.63 KiB) Viewed 618 times


Edit: S. stuckyi leaves achieve lengths of 5-7' although reportedly taller in habitat
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#14  Postby Gee.S » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:53 pm

I have outdoor S. cylindrica leaves of 4'+, and it doesn't even like AZ that much. As with S. trifasciata, impressive heights can be achieved pretty quickly when they like their digs. My experience with a couple S. cylindrica clones suggests individuals that usually produce three leaves before calling it a day and shooting out the next rhizome. My limited experience with S. stuckeyi suggests individual leaves. So yeah, that's a big difference.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#15  Postby Spination » Sun Apr 02, 2017 2:36 pm

Inflorescence developing
2017 04 02 Sansevieria Boncel b X800.jpg
2017 04 02 Sansevieria Boncel b X800.jpg (191.23 KiB) Viewed 586 times


Noticed as well S. suffruticosa also flowering
2017 04 02 Sansevieria suffruticosa c X800.jpg
2017 04 02 Sansevieria suffruticosa c X800.jpg (274.55 KiB) Viewed 586 times

2017 04 02 Sansevieria suffruticosa d X800.jpg
2017 04 02 Sansevieria suffruticosa d X800.jpg (258.14 KiB) Viewed 586 times
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#16  Postby Spination » Thu Apr 13, 2017 1:58 pm

Progress - Boncel's lowest flowers opening up.
2017 04 13 Sansevieria Boncel blooming a X800.jpg
2017 04 13 Sansevieria Boncel blooming a X800.jpg (190.02 KiB) Viewed 562 times
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#17  Postby Agave_fan » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:02 am

Update to my part of this thread which I hijacked from spiny last spring. D))

Picture today of the sansevieria I posted about back in March that we threw around some species guesses on (yay, actually have grass now):
sansevieria.jpg
sansevieria.jpg (105.49 KiB) Viewed 168 times


Here is the Tl:dr refresher from above: Purchased this plant(s) 4-5 years ago with no label and was only told not to keep it in bright light. The leaves are completely cylindrical without any noticeable concave side and the larger leaves/spikes are about 5'. Some have slight ridging around entire leaf/spike (can see on one of the previous pictures), others are smooth, some are mottled, some dark green (may be connected to age as the largest ones tend to be the dark green or dark blue) and some of those that get more sun are a very beautiful powder blue. I tried to get a photo of the blue coloration (less than what it was when plant was in the sun a couple months ago) but cannot capture that pretty powder blue. :( Here is the untouched photo:
blue sans.jpg
blue sans.jpg (93.5 KiB) Viewed 168 times


I have noticed that the ridging might be connected to water? When the plants see rainfall they seem to lose it and become smooth and they have more defined ridging under drought conditions.

I have not updated the soil (as I said I would) and larger plants continue to lean due to the shallow root system and loose soil. The new leaf/spikes appear a little ways away from others when they emerge, they do not grow in any type of fan shape or share a base.

I did place two test leaves/spikes into 6+ hours of sun and those spikes did well with growth and one of them took on that beautiful blue coloration as it acclimated to more sun. Unfortunately the area I placed them in had to be re-landscaped so I threw the spikes into a couple of plastic pots 'intending' on planting later. (I always have good intentions but often procrastinate).

I have still not seen any flowers.

So why the update?

Well, a couple years ago when moving the pot indoors I noticed a weird looking offset at the base of one of the large leaves/spikes that wasn't cylinder like everything else in the container. It was one of the spikes that tipped and fell out and the new plant was coming off the root system. Unfortunately I did not take photos and the offset died shortly after, probably from the trauma of being uprooted. I just thought it was a fluke and didn't give it another thought.

Well, I noticed recently that one of the leaves/spikes (i know they are leaves but I always have this urge to call these things spikes due to the shape) I threw into the container a couple months ago has one of the odd shaped offsets growing up from its base again so I thought perhaps if I updated with photos that this might help identify what sansevieria I have? While not as good as a flower, can plants be identified from an unusual offset which might point to lineage?
sans offset.jpg
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#18  Postby Spination » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:01 pm

Awesome!

You're observations are pretty much right on.
a) cross-banding disappears with age of the leaf
b) the ridges are accentuated with dehydration

I have a lot going on at the moment, but when I have an opportunity, I'll check and see what I can find out. What you have is a species whereby the juvenile form is a rosette, and the mature form is cylindrical spear(s). One such species is S. fischeri, but I don't think that's what you have. The juvenile rosettes appear different. In the case of S. fischeri, it takes about 10 years for the rosette form to mature enough and enough energy built up in the underground rhisome structure before the spears are produced. Also, the reverse can happen, whereby a spear transplanted can revert to producing new rosette-form plantlets (because there's no extensive rhisome structure with years of stored energy to continue producing the mature form. I find this one of the most amazing phenomenon that some of these Sans species exhibit.

Anyway, very interesting!
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#19  Postby Agave_fan » Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:24 am

Thanks Spiny!

I will do some research into this amazing phenomenon! :))
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#20  Postby Marlon Machado » Thu Nov 02, 2017 12:39 pm

The above picture of the offsets born out of the leaf-cutting identify the species as Sansevieria fischeri. Leaf-cuttings offsets of S. stuckyi are different - the leaves are usually narrower and much longer, and have rounded edges, while the leaves of juvenile S. fischeri have acute horny edges like the ones in the picture.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#21  Postby Spination » Thu Nov 02, 2017 1:54 pm

I too noticed the similarity regarding rosettes being borne of the spear after being separated. Here is one of mine. It was purchased as a mature form Sansevieria fischeri Variegated with 2 spears, but unfortunately I lost the nicest spear to rot the first season. The remaining spear (rather plain looking) survived, but then grew a rosette out of it. The rosette is typical fischeri. Note the THICK, channeled, keeled leaves. Margins tend to be smooth, straight, and not wavy. Leaves most definitely are not thin. It's kind of like a canoe with a very thick floor. For that reason, I rejected the idea of the ?? plant as fischeri, because the leaves just don't look right.

So here's that plant shown from 3 angles, hopefully to emphasize just how thick those leaves are as seen from slightly differing views. This would be 1st generation rosette form from a spear, and pretty young too (less than a year old).
2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri _ Spear to Rosette a.jpg
2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri _ Spear to Rosette a.jpg (104.44 KiB) Viewed 76 times

2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri _ Spear to Rosette b.jpg
2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri _ Spear to Rosette b.jpg (89.07 KiB) Viewed 76 times

2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri _ Spear to Rosette c.jpg
2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri _ Spear to Rosette c.jpg (99.96 KiB) Viewed 76 times


This is an older example, showing the rosette form after several years of maturing. This cluster was finally maturing enought to begin throwing out a new more spear-like mature form, but I wanted to harvest one very nice variegate from the cluster, and I suppose that's going to set back the whole maturing into spear making thing. Oh well, can't make an omelette without breaking a few eggs, right? Or, can't have it both ways...
2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri Variegated _ Older Rosette a.jpg
2017 11 02 Sansevieria fischeri Variegated _ Older Rosette a.jpg (85.26 KiB) Viewed 76 times


I'll leave myself an out though... maybe it is a variant of fischeri I am not familiar with.
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#22  Postby Marlon Machado » Thu Nov 02, 2017 7:04 pm

Hi Tom, very nice fischeri you have there! Agave_fan's plant is also fischeri, the offsets from the leaf-cutting are just at a more juvenile stage than your plant is, but in time they will also grow thicker leaves with straight margins - either the offsets directly, or the offsets from these offsets ;)

The leaf that Agave_fan planted broke off from the rhizome of the main plant, so it was effectively a leaf-cutting. The cutting surface healed over and calloused, and from the growing callus - which is a mass of undifferentiated tissue - eventually the offsets were formed (there are four of them, one just emerging).

In the case of your plant, it was not a leaf-cutting, but a mature plant that lost one leaf, and this set it back a little bit, so that new growth out of the rhizome took the form of a more juvenile stage. I can tell you did not lose the rhizome because the new growth was variegated as well - if all you had was a leaf-cutting, chances are you would get green offsets, and perhaps some albino.

Yes, when you divide your plant it will set it back again, and new growth in both divisions will likely continue to show juvenile characteristics. But then, instead of one bigger new growth, you will have one or more new growths from each division, and this way you propagate the plant faster ;)
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#23  Postby Spination » Thu Nov 02, 2017 7:37 pm

Marlon, thanks for all the great info. All you say makes sense, and I feel like I've learned just a little bit more about S. fischeri. Cool!

Also, I feel better about dividing my older plant/cluster. On the one hand, it seemed a shame to split it up, and probably lose the opportunity to see it grow spears sooner than later... but I did opt for the possibility once both divisions settled in/recovered, and start growing further, to have two growths producing offsets rather than the one.

Here's the division I was looking to separate from the group, with just a little bit better variegation than the original or the other offsets. Really looking forward to see what it eventually produces...
2017 09 18 Sansevieria fischeri variegated offset a.jpg
2017 09 18 Sansevieria fischeri variegated offset a.jpg (90.37 KiB) Viewed 65 times
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Re: Sansevieria early activity

Post Number:#24  Postby Agave_fan » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:38 am

Fascinating! Thanks Spiny and Marlon for some very interesting information on this plant!
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