Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Use this forum to discuss matters relating to succulent Euphorbiaceae genera far too plentiful to enumerate. This is where one posts unknown plant photos for ID help.

Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#1  Postby Stan » Thu Apr 13, 2017 4:01 pm

I haven't gone too far into this website. I don't know if its ONLY habitat photos..or just this poster. I thought you all would enjoy. I just planted mine. In 20 years it will be too big for the spot.. :roll:
https://public.fotki.com/fyntwa/habitat ... html#media
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#2  Postby Agave Down Under » Mon May 01, 2017 2:48 am

That's sure an impressive picture!!! Some more great nature Euphorbias there!
My Snowflake has filled the pot and pushing up now
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#3  Postby Agavemonger » Mon May 01, 2017 6:01 am

Wow! :8:

What a great photo! D))

I have been growing these, along with several other low-growing Euphorbia species, outside for a few years in pots; they have handled all sorts of abuse, including neglect, full sun all day, and yearly frost with no real damage to speak of. :U Granted, I have only experience with taking them down to around 27 degrees Fahrenheit, but clearly many species can take much lower temperatures than that.

I guess I will have to start taking better care of these plants, as they just keep getting better and better with age. A lot of Euphorbia species are definitely a lot more frost, and even hard freeze, tolerant then I would have thought. Many of these species, with a little experimentation, should be able to handle full sun scenarios in the desert communities of Phoenix, Yuma, Tucson, and perhaps even Las Vegas. Although an awful lot of Euphorbias are quite frost tender, clearly some are less prone to damage than others. Geoff claims success with some species in the particularly touchy cold-drainage area where he lives near Acton, so I would think that there are quite a few that could handle the afore-mentioned Southwestern cities, and perhaps some of the lower Gold-Country cities of the Western Sierra foothills.

Could some of you folks post your results with Euphorbia species growing in these areas?

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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#4  Postby Melt in the Sun » Mon May 01, 2017 9:55 am

Monger - my experience with this genus is limited and hasn't been all that successful.

I have grown and killed:
- horrida, in ground, totally dead within a week of planting (!?)
- polygona, in ground, survived a year or so before dying. Over/underwatered? Not sure.
- polygona 'snowflake', in ground, same spot and same result as regular polygona. Lasted less than a year.
- heterochroma, potted, loved the sun but not the cold, "froze" somewhere in the mid-high 30s.

I have yet to kill:
- stellata hybrid, potted. Why did I buy this? It's flowering right now but has looked half dead for a long time.
- resinifera, in ground, no surprise here.
- enopla, in ground, no frost this year so it's still alive.
- virosa, in ground, very slow but getting some size now, almost 1'. It was expensive as a tiny seedling and I keep thinking I should dig it up and sell it before it dies unexpectedly one day.
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#5  Postby mcvansoest » Mon May 01, 2017 1:43 pm

Monger, my experience like Danny is limited, I have killed:

E. lactea
E. obesum
E. polygona
I have tried several others that I do not really have good records of, so no memory of the names of them.

Most of them due to overwatering and/or too much sun.

I have currently alive and kicking for at least several years:
E. tirucalli 'firesticks' - in the ground, as long as there is no serious frost this does fine, I do cover it, but soon it will be too big it is going on 5 foot tall and is very bushy. Even at ~freezing you might damage some growth points. Ts down to mid-high 20s can wipe a plant out (happened to my neighbor's plant a few years back - though it did grow back eventually).
E. tirucalli - in the ground, the regular version appears more frost resistant, had limited damage during the one low-mid 20s spell I have had since living here. It is thriving and now about 8 feet tall and its main trunk is starting to look like the tree it is.
E. resinifera, in the ground see Danny's comment.
E. enopla - in pot seems to be doing fine.
E. horrida - in pot doing fine.
E. 'dragon bones' - sorry need to look up the correct name - in pot, does not like water lost one of three stems due to overwatering in the summer. This plant has had new growth but gives me the feeling it is just hanging on, have been meaning to just plop it in the ground for a while now, but never makes up to the top of the garden to do list...
E. polygona 'snowflake' in pot in full shade, seems to be doing really well.
E. xanti - Baja spurge not a succulent Euphorbia, but it grows really well here in some shade, trying to take over the front yard, but not that hard to keep under control if you spend a lot of time in your yard like most of us do, just pull any new sprouts where you do not want them.

I'd get more, but when I have a plant acquisition budget, Agaves, Cacti, and Aloes usually take up the top positions of plants to get, so only end up getting the occasional one.
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#6  Postby Gee.S » Tue May 02, 2017 10:26 pm

I can't recall all the Euphorbia I killed, but it was early days and I had to learn the hard way how tender many of these are.

I currently have E. aeruginosa, E. coerulescens, E. milli, E. resinifera, and E. royleana, all doing well. E. milli seems less rough and tumble than others, but it's a fast grower come spring, and looks absolutely sparkling much of the year.

You guys really need to get on the E. royleana bandwagon. This is an absolute rock star for xeric landscapes. Takes sun, takes frost, impervious to browsers, grows and branches quickly, and easy to propagate via cutting, so easy and prolific, I oft wonder why these continue to command such steep prices on the market.
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#7  Postby Viegener » Wed May 03, 2017 12:52 am

Are there any tricks to E. aeruginosa? I just killed one of my two, I think by letting it dry out. It's one of my favorites...

Also the similarly blue E. greenwayi, beautiful markings but a slow grower. Euphorbia canariensis is a good & easy grower here.
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#8  Postby Gee.S » Wed May 03, 2017 12:40 pm

It's my only potted Euphorbia, only because it's so small. Dunno what I'm doing right or wrong, it just seems to like it here.
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"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#9  Postby mcvansoest » Wed May 03, 2017 12:43 pm

Gee.S wrote:You guys really need to get on the E. royleana bandwagon. This is an absolute rock star for xeric landscapes. Takes sun, takes frost, impervious to browsers, grows and branches quickly, and easy to propagate via cutting, so easy and prolific, I oft wonder why these continue to command such steep prices on the market.


I'd jump on it, but AZ cactus sales, the only place showing up within the first 3 pages of google search results listing them as actually for sale is currently sold out, and I cannot find it anywhere else for sale, so maybe that explains there continued expense: very few places have them actually on the market...
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Re: Habitat photos of Snowflake Euphorbia.

Post Number:#10  Postby Gee.S » Wed May 03, 2017 1:19 pm

They had some at Shady Way last time I was there. You might want to call before heading on out, it was several weeks ago.
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