Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Use this forum to discuss matters relating to succulent Euphorbiaceae genera far too plentiful to enumerate. This is where one posts unknown plant photos for ID help.

Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#1  Postby necturus » Thu Aug 10, 2017 9:51 am

Anyone growing Euphorbia in zone 9a? Let's say for sake of discussion this is a warm 9a that only hit low 9a temps every 5 years or so, and high 8b once every 10-20 years. I have read about some that seem promising, like E. royleana, resinifera (sp?) but not too many others.

Also, how feasible do you think it would be to grow some of the larger columnar species outside in this conditions with modest protection, e.g. Frost clothes or plastic?
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#2  Postby mcvansoest » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:06 am

I am zone 9b/10a, so a direct comparison is not possible.

I do not grow many euphorbias I have resinifera in the ground, tirucalli (both the regular version and fire sticks) and a non succulent one: E. xanti. The fire sticks gets some frost damage if left uncovered when it goes below freezing, but the regular version and resinifera have been fine as has the xanti. I have a few more in pots that are protected from getting really cold by being close to the house.

As to columnar cati. I think there are definitely possibilities for you. Saguaros should take 9a, Pachycereus pringlei (Cardon) will definitely take damage, especially when young. There are a bunch of South American columnars that should do well too. Plenty of options there.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#3  Postby Azuleja » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:57 am

My 9a sounds similar to yours. While wandering dirt roads one day this summer, look what I found much to my delight and surprise. Saguaro?
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#4  Postby mcvansoest » Thu Aug 10, 2017 12:13 pm

I am pretty sure those are not Saguaro. Saguaros only produce blooms at the stem/branch tips and I think I can see some flower? remnants/buds further down the stem of the one on the left.
That would make it either Cardons or Echinopsis terscheckii, my bet is on the latter, given that Cardons would really not like a lot of below freezing nights...
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#5  Postby Stan » Thu Aug 10, 2017 12:55 pm

Euphorbia coerulescens is said to be hardy to zone 9a. Euphorbia canariensis also. Euphorbia cooperi is one of the choicest tree Euphorbia of them all..and most cold tolerant. There are others I'm sure.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#6  Postby Stan » Thu Aug 10, 2017 12:56 pm

Azuleja wrote:My 9a sounds similar to yours. While wandering dirt roads one day this summer, look what I found much to my delight and surprise. Saguaro?


Good old E.tersheckii enjoying 90-120F summer days and drier winters. It even laughs at valley tule fog.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#7  Postby Azuleja » Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:24 pm

Awesome, thanks for the ID on those! It was a mighty wet winter and my eyes about popped out of my head when I saw them here. Aside from a runaway Opuntia or two cactus generally aren't seen up here.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#8  Postby Gee.S » Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:37 pm

Great topic! I think E. royleana in and of itself, may go some distance toward sating your Euphorbia lust. Branching, fast growing, gorgeous!

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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#9  Postby Geoff » Thu Aug 10, 2017 9:15 pm

some more that I am growing outdoors in Acton (zone 8b/9a) are Euphorbias anoplia, antisyphylitica, coerulescens, echinus, enopla, ferox, flanaganii (and a variety of hybrid medusoid plants), horrida (many varieties), inconstantina, lambii (under a palm so some protection), mammillaris, polygona (many varieties), rigida, submammillaris, tubiglans, jansvellensis and virosa.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#10  Postby Paul S » Fri Aug 11, 2017 3:32 am

Here in England the hardiest succulent Euphorbia by a country mile is E. clavaroides var truncata. It will withstand -15C in the open garden. it is also probably the least impressive - until it starts to form a creeping mat, molding itself to its surroundings.

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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#11  Postby Gee.S » Fri Aug 11, 2017 3:59 am

I like it! That's a great ground cover.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#12  Postby necturus » Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:15 pm

Great ideas, guys! Keep 'em coming. No wonder E. clavaroides var truncata is so hardy, it hails from Lesotho! I'm always keen to learn about interesting plants from there, they are bound to be pretty tough.

How cold hardy is E. cooperi? I see it listed as 24-25 degrees on here. That would make it a maybe with protection here. It's a nice looking tree-type.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#13  Postby Azuleja » Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:40 pm

From what I read, Euphorbia pseudocactus (zig zag) is hardy to 10F. I didn't realize this today when I saw a giant one in a split open pot in the clearance section of OSH. The price wasn't marked and no one was outside so I left, but I'm going to see if it's still there tomorrow.
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Re: Zone 9a Euphorbia?

Post Number:#14  Postby Stan » Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:58 pm

Azuleja wrote:From what I read, Euphorbia pseudocactus (zig zag) is hardy to 10F. I didn realize this today when I saw a giant one in a split open pot in the clearance section of OSH. The price wasn't marked and no one was outside so I left, but I'm going to see if it's still there tomorrow.


They are hardy..but Zig Zag, like the coearulescens are VERY prone to rot. Plant them high and you should have no problems. Worked for me after the first one died in a early 2000's wet winter.
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