Agave mite?

Use this section to discuss matters relating to any and all issues involving horticultural pest and disease management. This is where one posts unknown pest/damage photos for ID help.

Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#51  Postby Gee.S » Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:40 pm

My rule is "three clean leaves", and that may be overkill, or may not, but I am confident it is enough. And what I mean by three clean leaves is this: If you have 100 Agaves, of which 25 are symptomatic, keep spraying all 100 until all afflicted 25 have three clean leaves, sans no newly symptomatic plants, of course.

One other small point. In my part of the world, Agave mite is naturally in habitat, and I frequent these places, but even if I didn't, mites go airborne, so there is always some small chance of infestation or recurrence from natural conditions beyond our control. It's a messy world out there, and sometimes we're going to get dumped on through no fault of our own.
Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#52  Postby Gee.S » Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:56 pm

Stone Jaguar wrote:Howdy, all.

I had not intended to wade in here, since I thought the forum had more or less resolved how to control these critters. Because it appears that there is still some misunderstanding about a recommended and widely-accepted protocol that calls for at least three miticides known to be effective against eriophyid mites to be used in rotation in order to eradicate (at least until the next exposure) it seems worth repeating.

Of products discussed and readily a available to nurserymen and dedicated amateur growers in the US, these would include Pylon, Forbid, abamectin (Avid and generics) and Sevin.

Personally, I assume every new aloe, agave and related plant that I acquire to be infested no matter how clean they look, and quarantine AND treat accordingly. In my case this involves at least two full cycles x three unrelated products at recommended app rates. A single application of one or two miticides is not accepted in any peer-reviewed study that I have read as being an effective control measure.

Although Gee and others have provided excellent photographic guides and visual “tells” indicating an eriophyid infestation (controlled or active) in agaves and aloes, positive proof requires a leaf section and a good microscope. Unlike spider mites, which are often visible to the naked eye or identifiable to species with a low magnification hand lens, AFAIK, eriophyids require >100x to be ID’d with certainty. Over the past 18 months I have received very suspect plants from nurseries I like and patronize frequently. As a long time grower, I am sympathetic to things occasionally slipping through the cracks, even by the best. While I understand and sympathize with people getting pissed when they receive substandard plants, I would be reluctant to make specific claims about eriophyid infestations without having proof beyond symptomatic evidence.

For my part, I have learned via considerable experience what combination of possibly subtle symptoms equate to a plant that can be restored to good appearance and health via miticide. Although there is no single symptom that would lead me to conclude eriophyid mite, certain single symptoms would raise my suspicions. And in the end, I suppose I cannot say with certainty whether miticides restore these plants by eliminating mites or some enigmatic execution of voodoo. But nor do I especially care. :))
Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#53  Postby Spination » Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:56 pm

DD - good to know they use Avid. That indeed is reassuring.

Jay - you are right that unless it is confirmed via dissection and microscope, one probably should not make a specific definitive claim. However, if it looks like a duck...walks like a duck... well, you get the drift. In this situation of mine, I have a plant that exhibits the same type of damage, and in the same way as when I dealt with the situation several years ago now. The only difference, this plant is WAAAAY worse!!!! The first plant I had which alerted me that something was wrong, had a single area of damage going in to the core, and an otherwise good looking plant. Of course, it only got worse after it arrived... This time around, there's really nothing much to point to in the way of good, because there is no area that isn't damaged. As suggested by others earlier in the discussion, it looks like the core isn't that bad, looks like maybe it's getting better...and the truest thing said is that at least it isn't dead. :lol:

I do want to mention that PDN contacted me via PM here, and insisted on sending me another plant. I did not contact them, and did not intend to. I would have to repeat as I have before in other threads regarding PDN, is that they do have great customer service. I've dealt with businesses (not necessarily plants) where the go-to line is to deny, and refuse (at least initially) responsibility, and do nothing. PDN is the opposite. Their M.O. is to rectify problems, and make things right. There is no denying they are a reputable business. Nobody's perfect, as they say - $hit happens... the difference is how folks deal with it after the fact. Clearly, they care.
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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#54  Postby Stone Jaguar » Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:10 pm

Tom, great to read that your faith in PDN - by all accounts an excellent nursery with a very, very highly-regarded owner - has been vindicated.

FWIW, I agree that the plant you showed is a pretty good example of what to be alarmed about. Given the value, numbers and proximity of plants in your collection, I would have probably been even more disappointed than you were when you opened the box. I just wanted to clarify that growers with large, painstakingly assembled collections of aloes and agaves+ should treat everything new, no matter how visually flawless, as a potential ”Typhoid Mary”.

BTW, Gee’s acid test of everything pushing several clean leaves prior to assuming everything’s cool seems like very good advice to all.

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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#55  Postby Gee.S » Sat Jan 13, 2018 4:27 pm

Image
Before

Nayert 039.JPG
After
Nayert 039.JPG (105.76 KiB) Viewed 32 times
Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#56  Postby Spination » Sat Jan 13, 2018 4:31 pm

The "after" is one awesome plant. Not a quick fix, but it does show that with treatment, and patience... ::wink::
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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#57  Postby Gee.S » Sat Jan 13, 2018 4:43 pm

You know, if you didn't look too close, that parryi looked pretty nice within about a year. Now, it was about three years before it looked pristine.
Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Agave mite?

Post Number:#58  Postby Spination » Wed Jan 17, 2018 4:37 pm

In conclusion, PDN sent me a lovely replacement plant. It just showed up on the doorstep today, somewhat unexpectedly. It's the next younger generation, but in perfect condition. I'm thinking what happened was they ran out of the ones advertised, and someone expediently picked one which was part of a batch in recovery from damage, and I'm sure not intended to be sold. Anyway, they went out of their way to send a replacement, even though I didn't ask - because that's how they roll. They got wind of the situation, and initiated their own efforts to fix it. I'd have to say that's the hallmark of an excellent reputation.
Anyway, here's the little beauty, and the markings on it sure look interesting. Don't know if that's just how they look when small, or if those stripes are something special, but it will be fun to watch it grow and see how it turns out.
2018 01 17 A potatorum Verschaffeltii Iriri Raijin Nishiki a.jpg
2018 01 17 A potatorum Verschaffeltii Iriri Raijin Nishiki a.jpg (61.38 KiB) Viewed 11 times
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