Mealybug

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Mealybug

Post Number:#1  Postby Gee.S » Sat Aug 05, 2017 5:43 pm

Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#2  Postby Agavemonger » Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:47 am

Consistent use of rotational miticides will eliminate these, scale, & aphids readily.

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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#3  Postby Gee.S » Sun Aug 13, 2017 10:39 pm

Agavemonger wrote:Consistent use of rotational miticides will eliminate these, scale, & aphids readily.

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Rotational insecticides perhaps. Just curious, is there anything other than plants alive in these sprayed areas, i.e. ants, grasshoppers, spiders?

I was exploring a treatise a few weeks ago that examined the phenomenon of local mass extinction. And you'll never guess the object of that examination. Coral reefs? Amazon rain forest? North African desertification? Urban blight? Not quite. Try Grundy Cty, Iowa, where industrialized farming has so utterly and completely replaced anything remotely copacetic to Gaia that virtually all natural life has vanished, including native grasses, birds, insects, on and on. There is nothing alive but corn. Absolutely horrifying. Interviews with regional farmers was compelling, to say the least. One farmer's wife in particular was aghast at what had happened to their land, but the only alternative is to sell the farm and abandon the lifestyle. I know your activities are far less extreme, but wonder if you've noticed any unintended consequences.
Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#4  Postby Spination » Mon Aug 14, 2017 8:25 am

While reading your last post, "GMO Corn" popped into my mind right after the mention of industrialized farming, as I remembered some years ago reading something about GMO corn and butterflies dying...and then I saw the subsequent comment regarding nothing alive but corn. So, I did some searching.

First, this article filled me in regarding the issue you bring up.
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/artic ... lture.aspx

A couple of things that were eye-openers to me... Bayer's bee research facility work, and Monsanto's purchase of a bee research facility. Interesting...

Speaking of unintended consequences, I found this interesting article too
http://naturalsociety.com/herbicide-res ... er-before/
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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#5  Postby Agavemonger » Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:03 am

Miticides specifically designed to do battle with Eriophyoid Mites eliminate all of the minor "sucking" insects, including Scale, Eriophyoid Mites, Aphids, and Mealy bug. Although they largely do not seem to have any direct immediate effect on Snails, Slugs, and other rasping or chewing insects, or Argentine ants, I believe that they discourage interest by these insects.

I do not include any Neonicitinoids or other P.A.N. "Bad Actor" chemicals in my rotational spray program. I consider these chemicals far too toxic to the environment (and to me) to have any use in my rotational spray program anymore. Rare exceptions would be an occasional or periodic use of Bifenthrin topically to eliminate Argentine Ants, and spot use of Deadline for Snails and Slugs. I suppose those of you who have major problems with weevils could work a neonicitinoid like Bifenthrin or even Imidicloprid into a spray program in order to discourage weevils from ever taking interest in your plants in the first place. I consider spraying these chemicals directly on the plants to be the most effective route to take. This way, the chemicals get deep into the leaf bases, where they will have the greatest effect on discouraging interest by the weevils in the first place, and you are avoiding most of the toxic effect on the environment by limiting the chemicals primarily to the plant tissues themselves.

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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#6  Postby Stone Jaguar » Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:54 am

Interesting observations.

Personally, with potted plants, I have always found Confidor (imidacloprid) far more effective as a drench than a spray. Ditto with Safari (dinotefuran), but even more so. Worth noting that I am referring to actively growing, not dormant, plants.

AFAIK, neonics most negative (and controversial) impact is on non-target inverts. Like most persistent pesticides, seepage into groundwater, streams, etc when used in volumes can be problematic to lower aquatic life and thence up the trophic chain. Not sure they have been definitely called out in series of peer-reviewed studies to represent a major hazard to vertebrates, other than via incidental intoxication. Linkage to songbird population declines ignore far bigger picture issues, IMO.

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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#7  Postby Gee.S » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:07 pm

Agave
"American aloe plant," 1797, from Greek Agaue, proper name in mythology (mother of Pentheus), from agauos "noble," perhaps from agasthai "wonder at".

"Some talk the talk, and others walk the walk, but we stalk the stalk"
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Re: Mealy Bugs

Post Number:#8  Postby Stone Jaguar » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:01 pm

Seem to recall we've been over this before. Having controlled persistent outbreaks of mealies (incl root mealies) in commercial greenhouses that had been so overrun the owners were at wits end, strongly recommend Enstar II in combo with a contact (malathion or Mavrik) and spreader-sticker to runoff. Get a good rechargable electric backpack or hand towed sprayer. All-in for the above probably just over USD 350.00, but for situation you describe, a worthwhile investment. Two or three cycles should produce desired results.

This is not a pest that is difficult to control with the right products and spray regimen. Those claiming mealies and armored scale are "impossible" to gain control over simply don't know their ag-chem. Child's play when compared to pesticide resistent two spot spider or cyclamen mites.

I use Safari in rotation with imidacloprid drenches in my own collection in the US, since I never let them get out of hand. Have not needed to resort to any tool in the greenhouse heavier than a 1.5 lt hand sprayer in years, but am ever vigilant and on them at first sign of a colony. Once they're gone, do not let them regain even a toe hold. Seasonally, thrips and aphids much bigger threat for me.

Always be aware of local laws governing pesticide use and employ common sense and proper safety gear when spraying.

Good hunting,

J
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Re: Mealybug

Post Number:#9  Postby Stone Jaguar » Sat Nov 18, 2017 7:47 am


While a single study whose conclusions lean quite a bit on informed speculation, IME, a very worthwhile lightly-technical read for those who are frustrated by some of the causal factors behind "ineffective" systemics. The efficacy of the product, coupled with real world translocation to the "affected parts" is key.
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Re: Mealy Bugs

Post Number:#10  Postby Stone Jaguar » Sat Nov 18, 2017 8:26 am

There is little argument that drenches involving systemic pesticides made on dormant or semi-dormant plants can be of limited value. Since my experience with worst case scenarios involved commercial setups with Cattleya orchids and all the cycad genera, it was probably easier for me to onboard and digest this limitation than it would be for the average grower.

I do not use bifenthrin, but have colleagues who spray Talstar Pro (equivalent to Bifen) in the greenhouse I'm in as a broad spectrum contact/residual and are more or less happy with the results. I would emphasize that no one at my location is controlling a major outbreak of anything. My personal experience, based on a couple decades wrestling with mealies and Asian cycad scale as a hobbyist and outside consultant is that a successful eradication program starts with a good contact insecticide in combination with Enstar sprayed to runoff with complete coverage - hence the importance of a spray rig that provides ease of use and uniform nozzle pressure - at curative label rates. Minimum two apps. Further touch up control can be provided as needed. Follow up with Safari (Dinotefuran) in rotation with imidacloprid drenches as preventive.

While I understand that these products are not available to everyone, and that some may find the cost prohibitive, I think the end result is well worth it for growers with larger collections facing a major outbreak.

I cannot emphasize enough the need for subsequent vigilance to avoid scale, mealybugs, etc from re-establishing themselves in one's collection. Once wiped out, I find that having a hand sprayer around containing a fresh solution of your prefered contact insecticide (I find Bayer 3 in 1 Advanced is a good, low-tox option in this role) or home remedy bug elixir will usually do it.
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Re: Mealy Bugs

Post Number:#11  Postby Azuleja » Sat Nov 18, 2017 10:58 am

Are the root mealies obvious to the eye?
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Re: Mealy Bugs

Post Number:#12  Postby Agavemonger » Sat Nov 18, 2017 11:25 am

Very obvious!

They often have a pink coloration when underground.

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