Could it be Aloe arborescens?

Use this forum to discuss matters relating to Aloe, Gasteria, Haworthia and related species. This is where one posts unknown plant photos for ID help.

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RCDS66
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Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#1

Post by RCDS66 »

Saw this majestic looking bush in a friend's house and she was very gracious to give me a few pups. This bush is around 20 years old and has been trimmed a few times. The outermost stems, as you can see in the photos, are sort of creeping on the ground and they have developed roots on points where the stem touches the ground. Could it be Aloe arborescens?
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#2

Post by mcvansoest »

The flowers give me an Aloe camperi vibe.
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#3

Post by RCDS66 »

Thanks for the input mcvansoest :U

Went through the threads of A. arborscens and A. camperi again, both initiated by Geoff. This is what Geoff wrote about camperi.
Geoff wrote: Sun Jan 05, 2014 7:41 pm This is a relatively common aloe in landscaping and botanical gardens throughout southern California. It's origin is from central east AFrica (Ethiopia and nearby). It is a rambling, shrubby, aggressively offsetting plant with narrow, lancelot, bright green spotted (when young) leaves growing up to about 3' tall. It is a pretty variable species. Flowers range from yellowish to dark orange and sometimes a combination of each. It is a late season flowerer, not making flowers normally until late spring to early summer. This is a moderately cold tolerant species, down to about 25F with minimal damage... but I have not tested it any lower than that. Aka Aloe eru.
And this is what he wrote about arborscens:
Geoff wrote: Sun Dec 22, 2013 11:23 pm Typical flowers are red to reddish orange, but a nice pale yellow-flowering form exists as well. Flowering is primarily in mid winter, but occasionally I have seen a flower pop out at an odd time of year.
The aloe in my friend's house pretty much goes with the above explanation of camperi, however, there are two notable differences:
1. The bush in my friends house is around 6 ft tall. A. camperi, as mentioned by Geoff and as seen in most photos grows around 3 ft. However, I am not sure if in a different climate it can grow up to 6 ft!
2. A.camperi is supposed to be a late bloomer but this one started blooming in mid December.

So, there is a confusion. The bloom shape is more like camperi but the size and bush shape is more like arborscens. Blooming season is like arborscens and not like camperi.
May be Geoff, who has grown both, may like to give his input.
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#4

Post by mcvansoest »

The obvious conclusion is a hybrid of the two. There are some varieties and/or cultivars of camperi out there that may have slightly different characteristics but similar flowers.

To me a bush of arborescens of that age in clearly great growing conditions would be much denser and probably even taller.
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

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Post by RCDS66 »

mcvansoest wrote: Sun Jan 21, 2024 12:55 am The obvious conclusion is a hybrid of the two. There are some varieties and/or cultivars of camperi out there that may have slightly different characteristics but similar flowers.

To me a bush of arborescens of that age in clearly great growing conditions would be much denser and probably even taller.
Hi macvansoest:
Just talked to my friend and confirmed the age of the plant. She confirmed that the plant is approximately 6 years old and not 20 that I mentioned in my opening post. Actually I confused the age of this plant with some other plant that she was referring to.
So, if the age is 5-6 years, it may well be a arborenscens-camperi hybrid as you mentioned in your comments and if a variation in bloom form and shape can be accepted than it may well be an arborenscens. But seeing the size of the bush, ie, 6 ft and the blooming season which is start of winters, possibility of it being camperi seems less likely. What say?
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#6

Post by Paul S »

Might it be A. pluridens?
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

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Post by RCDS66 »

Paul S wrote: Sun Jan 21, 2024 2:45 am Might it be A. pluridens?
That's another close contender. Thanks for the input Paul S.
A. pluridens looks more like a tree aloe with larger leaves and a solitary stem or in certain photos there are offsets at the bottom but the main stem is tall, thick and solitary. In case of aborescens there are many stems of almost identical size and medium thickness, the plant has a bushy appearance and the leaves are relatively smaller. A. camperi has a smaller bush as compared to aborescens but the overall bush shape is similar. All three have slightly different blooms but the blooms in my photo have a form of camperi and colour of aborescens. So if nothing else comes up, I will be more inclined towards a aborescens x camperi hybrid. :roll: :?
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#8

Post by Epiphyte »

very nice. does the plant itself ever turn red? it might be an aloe cameronii hybrid.
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Re: Could it be Aloe arborescens?

#9

Post by RCDS66 »

Epiphyte wrote: Sun Jan 21, 2024 8:28 am very nice. does the plant itself ever turn red? it might be an aloe cameronii hybrid.
As far as I know, this aloe does not turn red like cameronii, however, the leaves do develop a slight reddish tinge during winters. The offsets that you see in the pics below were cut from the mother plant yesterday.
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